Book Review

Review: Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande

Being Mortal

 

Rating: ☆☆☆☆
Audience: Adult, one curse word, no love scenes, or violence
Length: 282 pages
Author: Atul Gawande
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
Release Date: October 7th, 2014
Image & Other Reviews on: Goodreads

 

BOOK SUMMARY:

In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending

Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Nursing homes, preoccupied with safety, pin patients into railed beds and wheelchairs. Hospitals isolate the dying, checking for vital signs long after the goals of cure have become moot. Doctors, committed to extending life, continue to carry out devastating procedures that in the end extends suffering.

Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession’s ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person’s last weeks or months may be rich and dignified.

Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, Being Mortal asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.

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MAKES YOU RECONSIDER.

While personally, death and all qualifying concepts still frighten me to some degree, I enjoyed the truths this book emanated.

Death is a hard conversation, and those right in the line of fire aren’t always getting the best that could be given them. NOT because of horrible doctors or anything to that affect [within regards to this book], just because, all of us are needing to learn how to ask the right questions. There’s so much more in those last few months of life that could be better handled if all of us approached it differently.

This book really opened my eyes to that line of thinking. What trade-offs are you willing to give for maybe a chance at having more time? We all will eventually have someone in our lives (or unfortunately, be this person) that wants to truly understand what’s happening. I feel marginally more prepared to handle these issues in the future. I appreciate Dr. Gawande’s take and how he addressed the topics and his own short-comings.

Hospice, assisted living, and other entities of this sort can be a lot more powerful when programs are appropriately provided and everyone understands the essence of care needed to help patients have the best day, they can at that moment.

A quick, thought-provoking read. One curse word was used. Appropriate for any audience comfortable with confronting the realities of mortality.

 

Book Review

Review: All the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry

All the Truth

 

Rating: ☆☆☆☆
Audience: YA/Adult, no language, discussion of tough topics (rape/whore/abuse), some kisses, no love scenes, some violence
Length: 274 pages
Author: Julie Berry
Publisher: Viking Books
Release Date: September 26th, 2013
Image & Other Reviews on: Goodreads

 

BOOK SUMMARY:

Four years ago, Judith and her best friend disappeared from their small town of Roswell Station. Two years ago, only Judith returned, permanently mutilated, reviled and ignored by those who were once her friends and family.

Unable to speak, Judith lives like a ghost in her own home, silently pouring out her thoughts to the boy who’s owned her heart as long as she can remember—even if he doesn’t know it—her childhood friend, Lucas.

But when Roswell Station is attacked, long-buried secrets come to light, and Judith is forced to choose: continue to live in silence, or recover her voice, even if it means changing her world, and the lives around her, forever.

This startlingly original novel will shock and disturb you; it will fill you with Judith’s passion and longing; and its mysteries will keep you feverishly turning the pages until the very last.

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A GOOD KINDA ODD.

This book was recommended to me and seemed interesting enough so here we are! Definitely an odd, keep you on your toes, not sure where this is going kinda book. I really enjoyed it! And may have finished it in essentially one sitting (baby to take care of and all ha!).

Set in what is perceived to be some type of Colonial period the story is broken up into choppy chapters and a unique POV. Judith speaks to a boy the entire time and she struggles to tell her story.

All I wanted to do was yell at Judith to SPEAK! So many odd things kept happening and the ending was starting to worry me. Berry weaves a creepy tale with characters you kinda hope burn.

While seriously, every single person will aggravate you at one point or another, this book is good! Matters resolved

I love finding interesting and different ways that authors choose to write! It’s a great experience for me because it mixes up the usual.

Some tough topics throughout, more mature audiences would be best suited. No language, some violence. A few kisses, but no love scenes.

Book Review

Review: Smoke in the Sun (Flame in the Mist #2) by Renee Ahdieh

Smoke in the Sun

 

Rating: ☆☆☆☆☆
Audience: YA, very little language, torture violence, some kiss scenes [one a touch love-ish]
Length: 408 pages
Author: Renee Ahdieh
Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons
Release Date: June 5th, 2018
Image & Other Reviews on: Goodreads

BOOK SUMMARY:

For weeks, seventeen-year-old Mariko pretended to be a boy to infiltrate the notorious Black Clan and bring her would-be murderer to justice. She didn’t expect to find a place for herself among the group of fighters—a life of usefulness—and she certainly didn’t expect to fall in love. Now she heads to the imperial castle to resume a life she never wanted to save the boy she loves.

Ōkami has been captured, and his execution is a certainty. Mariko will do what she must to ensure his survival—even marry the sovereign’s brother, saying goodbye to a life with Ōkami forever.

As Mariko settles into her days at court—making both friends and enemies—and attempting Ōkami’s rescue at night, the secrets of the royal court begin to unravel as competing agendas collide. One arrow sets into motion a series of deadly events even the most powerful magic cannot contain. Mariko and Ōkami risk everything to right past wrongs and restore the honor of a kingdom thrown into chaos by a sudden war, hoping against hope that when the dust settles, they will find a way to be together.

Set against the backdrop of feudal Japan, Smoke in the Sun is the breathless, romantic, not-to-be-missed fiery conclusion to a spell-binding adventure.

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OKAMI IS MY CINNAMON ROLL.

I love him. That little cinnamon roll is my latest book boyfriend, because he just gives you all the heart eyes. His loyalty, sass, and honor round out a great character.

But on a real note, I LOVE BAD-A WOMEN. Mariko for the win. Ahdieh brought a dynamic, thoughtful and strong character in Mariko, and Yumi. Even Kanako, while evil-esque, still awesome. It’s so great when female characters really get the spotlight.

This book excels at multiple POV. Even when it changes mid-chapter, it’s easy to tell who’s speaking and what is happening. It was great getting everyone’s views because it rounded at the story from so many angles. I felt the anguish and triumphs of each character. Ahdieh is quickly becoming one of my top favorite authors. Her duologies make me happy and are the perfect length to convey a remarkable story.

Definitely a YA novel, maybe 2 curse words. Some kissing scenes with one being a touch love-ish. Multiple characters involved with torture violence.

 

 

 

 

Book Review

Review: A Thousand Perfect Notes by C.G. Drews

ATPN

Rating: ☆☆☆☆
Audience: YA, no language, child abuse/violence, a kiss or two
Length: 282 pages
Author: C.G. Drews
Publisher: Orchard Books
Release Date: June 7th, 2018
Image & Other Reviews on: Goodreads

BOOK SUMMARY:

An emotionally charged story of music, abuse and, ultimately, hope.

Beck hates his life. He hates his violent mother. He hates his home. Most of all, he hates the piano that his mother forces him to play hour after hour, day after day. He will never play as she did before illness ended her career and left her bitter and broken. But Beck is too scared to stand up to his mother, and tell her his true passion, which is composing his own music – because the least suggestion of rebellion on his part ends in violence.

When Beck meets August, a girl full of life, energy and laughter, love begins to awaken within him and he glimpses a way to escape his painful existence. But dare he reach for it?

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BREAKING MY HEART C.G. DREWS.

This book is by a debut author that I follow on Bookstagram. It had to travel all the way from Australia and it did not disappoint!

Loosely based on Beethoven, this book brought all the sadness and hope mixed together that I could barely handle. All I wanted to do was hug Beck, then shake him, then hug him all over again. I JUST WANT HIM TO FEEL BETTER, OKAY?

I enjoyed that each character had their own voice. I wasn’t bored when another person showed up because they all had their own style.

Though I’m going to cut off the Maestro’s fingers if I ever get a chance.

August was sweet, and a truly good character to add the light at the end of the tunnel for this book. I loved her tenacity and wholeheartedness attitude.

The atmosphere of this book was more unique then I’ve recently seen in contemporary YA novels. A nice breathe of fresh air. While sad, there’s a belief that things will get better and can’t possibly end the way they do.

Strongly YA, no language [words in the “low” curse category such as moron are used]. Child abuse and violence present. It made me wince a few times having to read through this story. A kiss or two, nothing heavy.